MemoGym: Strengthening the European Memory

An educational project to strengthen historical memory in the spirit of European values, focusing in particular on the attractiveness of the way of communication with young audiences. An interactive exhibition of life-size puppets, representing six Slovak personalities who, by their lifelong attitude and work, have preserved and cultivated democratic European values ​​and orientation of (Czecho)slovakia towards advanced democratic European states.

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Cultural policy as a source of national culture

Cultural policy as a source of national culture

Culture is the foundation of Europe, all keep repeating over and over. Without culture, it is impossible to understand our old continent. In reality, however, Europeans are talking about monetary systems, unemployment, new technologies, immigration and security. Culture remains only for exhibitions, festivals and tourism. Indeed, since 1989 Europe worked together closely in the areas of economy transport, science and technology only. Even nowadays, these questions appear to be more urgent than defining the role of the humanities and culture in the face of the issues of security in Europe, for example.
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Job opportunity in culture: a personality

By the accession of Central European countries to the European Union we have gone along a thorny but much needed path to be incorporated into the economic and legal space with 500 million inhabitants. We have harmonised the legislation, regulated the conditions of operation of large and small businesses, adapted the import and export rules, as was required by the accession process. In doing so, each of us has gone a different road, although in the past we belonged together within the Soviet sphere of influence. The agriculture of Hungary did not amount to that of Slovakia, let alone the German one, copyrights, licenses, statistics and business management in the Czech Republic did not equal those in Poland.
The entire infrastructure underlying the economic and financial strength of each state was subject to protracted changes and we had to adapt. Often we read romantic accounts of what would have happened if European integration started from culture and not from coal and steel.
But when we delve deeper into the review of the existing infrastructure underlying the strength of the various national cultures, even a naive Dunno knows that there are differences among us shaped by the history huge that we would still sit in Rome today arguing over which management system culture is better and more modern. And yet, although the culture is not a part of the integration rules, the systems of funding, governance of institutions and education in culture in the individual EU countries are changing, and in a way harmonising as well.
One of the crucial tasks, in addition to the financial crises and turmoil which have affected the public budgets, was played by the great personalities of European culture, who were appointed in the second half of the 20th century to the posts of ministers of culture with their ideas and plans.
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